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20120901
20120930
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CSPAN 8
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to finding the watts company, elroy worked for governor john engler of michigan. he, like me, is from detroit michigan and is a graduate of moorehouse college. thank you, elroy. [applause] >> next, albert sanders jr. come on down. albert sanders jr. is counsel to the united states committee on the judiciary. he's a principal legal and policies adviser, the assistant majority leader to senator deck durbin from illinois, chairs the committee on constitution, civil rights and human rights. he offers counsel on issues ranking from privacy, finances reform and he was named to the luke's 21 under 40 list. mr. sanders earned his become a. in political science from moorehouse college in 2001, there after, completed a certificate at wharton business school, while getting his law degree from the university of pennsylvania, where he was president of the path in 2004. he's a member of the state bar of california and the district of columbia bar. [applause] >> andre d. washington, senior sociology major from hinesville, georgia, who currently serves as the 81st student association government president for
that. >> uh-huh. and my attitude on detroit is we rebuilt that, and by we the government and business and workers together, and also -- i love all of the talk about bin laden. i think it is great. we saw the democrats taking back a lot of things the republicans have been pretending their own. fiscal responsibility honor for the military and family values. and all over twitter you have our right-wingers saying stop rubbing bin laden in our face -- >> stephanie: yeah, because the republicans wouldn't have mentioned it. you know they would never mentioned that if they had gotten him. >> oh yeah. >> stephanie: i loved john kerry's line, ask bin laden if he is better off than he was four years ago. >> john kerry was the rocky ford joke. that was dynamite. >> stephanie: here is more from the president. >> obama: we don't think the government can solve all of our problems, but we don't think the government is the source of all of our problems, any more than our welfare recipients or corporations, or unions, or immigrants, or gays or any other group we're told to blame f
detroit was in trouble, president obama saved the auto industry and saved 1 million jobs. seven presidents before him republicans and democrats tried to expand health care to all americans. president obama got it done. he made an historic investment to lift our nation's public schools and expanded pell grants so that more young people could afford college. and because he knows that we don't have an ounce of talent to waste, the president took action to lift the shadow of deportation of a generation of young law-abiding immigrants called dreamers. now it's time for congress to enshrine in law their right to pursue their dreams in the only place they've ever called home. america. four years ago, america stood on the brink of a depression. despite incredible odds, and united republican opposition, our president took action and now we've seen 4.5 million new jobs. he knows better than anyone that there's more hard work to do. but we're making progress. and now, we need to make a choice. it's a choice between a country where the middle class pays more so that millionaires can pay less, or a cou
of it all, go back and read ronald reagan's 1980 acceptance speech in detroit. it is one most of the ideological speeches i've ever read in my life. >> i would argue this country's waiting for a mandate for some sort of galvanizing -- >> reagan said you elect me, this is what i'm going to do and i'm going to radically alter the course of the government that began growing in 1933. >> so here is president obama last night, phrasing our troops in the war zone while mocking mitt romney's recent foreign policy tour. >> we are forever in debt to a generation who sacrifice has made this country safer and more respected. we will never forget you. and so long as i'm commander in chief, we will sustain the strongest military the world has ever known. when you take off the uniform, we will serve you as well as you've served us, because no one who fights for this country should have to fight for a job or a roof over their heads or the care that they need when they come home. [ applause ] >> my opponent and his running mate are new to foreign policy. [ applause ] but -- from all that we've
. >> what did mitt romney say? you all know this. he said let detroit go bankrupt. in strong -- in strong contrast, president obama took action, putting together a rescue team, demanding real change and real sacrifice from everyone involved, from management, from labor -- >> bob king, the head of the uaw speaking there. a hard pitch from the democrats here on the auto bailout, this is the president of the union, heard from an autoworker. this is an issue you have covered so intensively. are they doing the politics right? >> they are. this is an issue where the republicans were clearly on the wrong side of history. it wasn't just the president write agcheck and saying we're going to do this. mr. king just referred to a rescue team. what president obama did after much thought and consideration and consternation put together a team headed up by ron bloom who had a lot of work in dealing with troubled steel factories and he wanted to get it right. as soon as these guys from detroit showed up in their jets in washington, it was a big story. he said don't do that again. come back in your own ca
you said and said we're not the worst schools in the country, detroit is the worst schools in the country, i said good for you, don't be guilty of low aspirations. i must say chicago has made progress, it's probably now the fourth worst school district in the country. i say this a big ironically. host: what are the problems? spell out the problems for the city. guest: the main problem, of course, is the condition of kids in inner cities in america. and i don't blame teachers for that. that is they are getting a lot of kids who do not have parental interest, parental involvement, a lot of kids from single parent homes. look, the singlemost important fact for the american future is 40 percent of our kids are born out of wedlock. this makes a difference in life, this makes a difference in society. so a lot of the kids that teachers and schools have to work with come to them less than ready for school, and what can they count on after school? some kids find, other kids know, it's not so good. so understand that the material they're getting isn't all potential rhodes scholars, w
with individual railroads. so you can get an exclusive contract, say between detroit and chicago, along a particular railroad line, you are able to maintain that line at a much cheaper cost than your arrival having to use roads or having to just bushwhack the open country. and by establishing those exclusive right-of-way, railroads got very cheap telegraph service. telegraph companies have the rights of way. by establishing those arrangements, unusual contractual arrangements which the courts were reluctant to challenge, and congress was reluctant to challenge, by doing that he was able to get around the limitations that state lawmakers have place on telegraph companies to the anti-monopoly laws. and those laws have been enacted as a response to morse. so you morse who fails, the state anti-monopoly laws, did he succeed by using the railroads to create the kind of monopolies -- >> are there any comparisons today for rise in an at&t and broadband and cell towers, et cetera? >> here's the comparison that really gets me. in 1996 congress enacted a law, open up competition. in local telecom
a number of districts, detroit for example has seen declinement which is going to affect your per people allocation, so there's a little bit of a squeeze play there in terms of funding and the district -- [inaudible] in a -- so no exaggeration to say there's a bit of a squeeze play with the funding there. host: how much of an increase were they asking for? how much was the mayor willing to go for? guest: so the -- complicated by the fact that the school board rescinded 47 had already agreed upon wages so that plays into the figure the union was asking. again, different figure systems loaded. i've seen anywhere from 19% in the first year alone of a contract to 30% over a four-year period. again, we don't know what actually is in the framework that has been agreed upon by district and union, but teachers, they did want to see an increase. they did want to see some of the wages that had been rescinded, restored, so we're going to have to see how that plays out. host: from new york, noel is an educator. you're on "washington journal." go ahead. caller: yes. i'm in agreement to the teachers c
mining accident. realizing there was no future there for him or his four children he came to detroit and worked with the auto factories so they could save enough money to bring the kids over, which he did. and then they had together as a family, said, to be successful in america you got to get an education. they couldn't afford an education. and the kids and parents said, if we all work and we all save, we could afford to send one of us to college. they sent my wife's dad. working and taking a couple jobs and saving your money so that your brother -- so went to college. general motors institute of technology, which is one of these programs you work a semester and go to school a semester. and after it was over he became more successful and was able to hire his brothers and brother-in-law and provide for them. both my dad and ann's dad did quite well in their life. when they came at the end of their lives, they passed along to ann and me, we both decided to give it all away. i have inherited nothing. everything we have we earned the old-fashioned way and that's by work. [applause] [ina
fundamentalist group that wants to detroit frdoms we believe in, not to mention our best ally in the entire region, israel. and israel's the only place over there that we can count on if everything goes wrong. and so our state department and the administration and previous administrations have made these kinds of mistakes and we have been strangely, strangely, strangely silent. so i just like to end up by saying to my colleagues we should profit from our past mistakes. we should make sure that we don't try to nation build. we can't make the world over in our image. it's not possible. we have to work with unsavory leaders sometimes, people that we don't like, that we don't think are good people because of stability in the region and because of america's interest. our interests ought to be number one. the protection of our country ought to be number one. the protection of our soldiers and the people who go to war and the people of this country ought to be number one. and of secondary importance are the lives of these people in these countries that are radical. . that ought to be our number on
that looked a lot of like a spirit of st. louis. was called detroiter. she named it the american girl. she told the press, if an american boy can have great dreams, why can't an american girl? and she went allot of. she made it as far as -- and she crashed in the sea. but she crashed within inside an nor wee began tanker. they saved her. she very perhaps more than any other of the fliers, she understood the new world of celebrity because she said early on, anybody who -- the first woman who fries across is going to be famous. they're going to make money, they're going to be famous. i don't want to go back to the life of a dental hygienist in florida. why shouldn't i do this? it's my way out. what's fascinating, when you look at the archives, there were all of these letters to these fliers from men and women. the but the most saying take me along. the most poignant from women and the women saw, you know, they would -- they were -- there was one letter from a woman who had seven children but five had died, there was one woman who slung burgers in philadelphia and she offered to bring food. a
the contrast with the empty and expedient spectacle last month in detroit where no nomination was contested, no question was debated, and no one dared to raise any doubt or dissent. [cheers and applause] democrats can be proud that we chose a different course and a different platform. we can be proud that our party stands for investment in safe energy, instead of a nuclear future that may threaten the future itself.we must not permit the neighborhoods of america to be permanently shadowed by the fear of another three mile island. we can be proud that our party stands for a fair housing law to unlock the doors of discrimination once and for all.the american house will be divided against itself so long as there is prejudice against any american buying or renting a home. and we can be proud that our party stands plainly and publicly and persistently for the ratification of the equal rights amendment. women hold their rightful place at our convention, and women must have their rightful place in the constitution of the united states.on this issue we will not yield; we will not equivocate; we wil
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)